Alberta´s Legislature turning 100 9,844 cubic yards of concrete used Open 362 days a year Other locations considered The foundation walls are from 9 to 12 feet thick Construction of columns Estimated cost $2.4 million Cherished Landmark Centre of Democracy The streetcar

Respecting Our Past, Embracing Our Future

Alberta Legislature Centennial Time Capsule Placement
September 25, 2013, at 11 a.m. in the Legislature Rotunda

One hundred years after it first opened its doors, the Alberta Legislature Building has become the foremost symbol of the democratic process in our province. Commemorating the centennial celebrations of the Legislature Building, the Alberta Legislature Centennial Time Capsule will be placed in the cornerstone of the Legislature Building to pass on a piece of today to the citizens of tomorrow.

Watch the live webcast on www.assembly.ab.ca

Did You Know?

The Legislature Building is 176 feet high from the ground line to the top of the dome and 340 feet in length. The wings are 130 feet long and 95 feet wide, and the central portion is approximately 80 feet wide and 254 feet long. In the construction of the foundation 9,844 cubic yards of concrete were used.

Photo Credit: NC-6-50
Construction of the front and dome facade of the Legislature Building in 1912. (Glenbow Archives NC-6-50)

Event Destination

Alberta´s Legislature represents many things to Albertans. To some it is the centre of democracy, providing a forum for activism and citizenship. To others it is an event destination, enjoyed primarily with friends and family for free activities. To others still, it is a most cherished landmark, rich with history, tradition and majestic architecture. Whatever it means to you, Alberta´s Legislature is a place for the people, and it is open 362 days a year for you to discover.

Location

The current site of the Legislature Building was not the only one considered. A 25-acre site near Jasper Avenue and First Street overlooking the Saskatchewan River was offered by James Carruthers. Another site near Jasper Avenue and Grierson Street, running south to the Saskatchewan River, was also suggested.

Photo Credit: A1954
A U.S. Air Force Douglas C-54 Skymaster flies over the Legislature in 1954. (Provincial Archives of Alberta A1954)

Did You Know?

The interior walls of the Legislature Building, excepting the rotunda and vaults, are built of hollow terra cotta blocks in order to allow partitions to be removed without interfering with the construction of the building or business operation of any department. The marble for the interior of the Legislature cost about $9,500 at the time.

Construction Site

Construction of the building continued year-round making it necessary to heat the materials used. A heating house with steam pipes covering the entire floor was constructed to hold the yards of stone and sand used in the Legislature Building´s construction.

Photo Credit: NA-1-42-10
Capitals for the Corinthian columns being carved for Alberta Legislature Building, Edmonton, Alberta in 1911. (Glenbow Archives NA-1042-10)

Did You Know?

It was estimated that about 35,000 yards of earth were removed in the excavation of the building. The removed earth was spread on parts of the grounds to make them more level. The Legislature Building is estimated to have cost $2.4 million at the time.

Cherished Landmark

The building was officially opened by the Governor General, HRH the Duke of Connaught, on September 3, 1912.

Photo Credit: nc6-12022
Families gather on the Legislature grounds in 1927. (Glenbow Archives NC-6-12022)

Centre of Democracy

In January 1912, not long after the Legislative Assembly began using the Chamber, unsightly cracks in the plaster on the columns and walls of the Chamber began to appear. Only days later as the Premier was introducing a Bill, he was showered with cracking plaster. The Chamber is 56 feet square and extends three storeys.

Did You Know?

In 1906 21 acres were purchased from the Hudson's Bay Company for the site on which the Legislature was built. It cost $4,000 per acre.

Photo Credit: Streetcar
The observation car of the Edmonton Radial Railway passes by the Alberta Legislature in 1914. (Provincial Archives of Alberta A4848)

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