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Assembly Proceedings Search Help

Display Documents/Download Documents

1. To display a particular day's Hansard transcript without doing any searching

2. To display the documents resulting from a search

2a. Navigation Symbols

Simple Search

1. Keyword searching tips

2. Nonsearchable Words

3. Phrase searching tips

Advanced Search

1. Search symbols and options

a. "AND which ALSO contain..."

b. "OR which contain..."

c. "BUT do NOT contain..."

d. "Within a PARAGRAPH of..."

e. "Within a few paragraphs of..."

f. "In the same PARAGRAPH as..."

g. "Followed anywhere by"

h. "Within 10 words of"

Other Searches

1. Date search

2. Using the HEAD field

3. Searching for divisions (recorded votes)

4. Query within query

5. Searching PDF documents (Hansard, committee transcripts, and indexes)


 

The home screen for the Hansard databases is the Display Documents tab, where Hansard documents from the current session may be viewed.  To perform a search in any of the Hansard databases, click on either the Simple Search or Advanced Search tab. 

Display Documents/Download Documents

1. To display a particular day’s Hansard transcript without doing any searching (from the Display Documents screen):

Display Hansard for this date (Current session only) :

  • click on down arrow at the end of the "Display Hansard for this date" box (They are listed in descending chronological order.)

  • click on required document

  • click on

  • Downloading. All documents from the current session are in PDF format, so you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0 or higher to download either the full document or a portion of the text. (There is a link on the Display screen which will enable you to download this version if you don’t have it.) Use the buttons on the Adobe button bar appearing under the address line to download or copy. Please note that page numbers in such downloaded text will not necessarily correspond to the official printed version.
    • To download the entire document, click on the Save button (top left) and follow the prompts.
    • To copy a portion of the text, click on the Select Text button, then highlight the text to be copied and press ctrl + c (or Edit-Copy). Exit Internet Explorer and open a word processor. Paste the text into a document by pressing ctrl + v (or Edit-Paste).
    • To find the portion of the text you wish to copy without having to scroll through the entire document, see the instructions under Searching PDF Documents.

2. To display the documents resulting from a search:

  • click on the date of any of the documents listed on the Search Results screen

Afternoon and evening transcripts for the same day are loaded into the database as separate documents with the same date but are differentiated from each other by either 1:30 p.m. or 8:00 p.m.

 

2a. Navigation symbols within the document

The top bar has the following options:

  • click to display the first occurrence of the search term in the document

At the first occurrence of the search term, the following navigation symbols enable you to move around within and between documents:

  • click on Next Hit to go to the next occurrence of the search term within the document
  • click on Previous Hit to go back to the previous occurrence of the search term within the document
  • Next Document signals that there are no more occurrences of the search term in that document and takes you to the next document in the list
  • Previous Document takes you back to the previous document in the list
  • takes you back to the previous document in the list or forward to the next document in the list
  • .returns you to the list of documents retrieved by the search
  • returns you to the search screen for a new search
  • will download the entire document; see following

Downloading. Starting in 2003 (25th Legislature, 3rd Session), all documents are in PDF format. If you are viewing a document from 2003, click on Download at the top of the screen. The PDF version of the document will display starting at the first occurrence of the term used in the search. To download either the entire document, or a portion, follow the instructions in 1. above. [do link to 1]

From 1991 to the end of 2002 documents in Hansard databases are in WordPerfect format, so if you are viewing a document from those years the steps to download or copy them are slightly different. Please note that downloading these documents into other word processors or converting them to other formats may result in changes in document layout. Also, please note that page numbers in such downloaded text will not necessarily correspond to the official printed version.

• To download the entire document, click on Download at the top of the document. Click on Save on the File Download pop-up box and follow the prompts.

• To copy a portion of the text, the entire document must be downloaded, as above. Next locate the portion of the document containing the term used in the search (press F2, type the search term, then click on Find next). Highlight the text to be copied and press ctrl+ c (or Edit-Copy). Exit that document and open the document in which the copy should be placed. Press ctrl + v (or Edit-Paste) to paste the text into that document.

Note: A portion of the text can also be copied directly from screen without downloading it, but all the HTML coding will copy also, including the coding that creates the arrows on screen. To do this, highlight the text to be copied and press ctrl+ c (or Edit-Copy). Exit that document and open the document in which the copy should be placed. Press ctrl + v (or Edit-Paste) to paste the text into that document. Delete the coding.


Simple Search

  • select the order in which the search results should be sorted by clicking on the down arrow.  The default is by document date, but there is also an option to sort by the number of hits in a document or by the relevance factor.

  Sort results by:

 

  • select the year to be searched by clicking on the down arrow.  The system defaults to the current year, but there is an option to search in all years (back to 1991) as well as any individual year in between.

Select year: 

Type keyword or phrase to search for; it can be all lowercase; for example, .kananaskiscomputer*crop insurancetraffic safety

Find all documents that contain:
  • click on to start

1. Keyword Searching Tips:

  • to find all variations of a keyword, type an asterisk(*) at the end of the keyword you want to search for. For example, typing "post*" will find post, posts, posted, posting, postgraduate, et cetera.
  • when using a member's name as a keyword, type a colon(:) at the end of it. This will find only those places where that member is actually speaking, as opposed to any other places where the name may just have been mentioned.  For example: "havelock:"   "nicol:"   "pannu:"
  • do not use the following as keywords: AND, OR, TO, BUT, NOT, as these are reserved symbols used when combining keywords to form a search. (See Advanced Search below.) Your search will fail if these are used as keywords in a Simple Search.

2. Nonsearchable Words (Simple and Advanced Searches)

In addition to the five words reserved for advanced searches, there is also a short list of words that ISYS does not index when Hansard issues are being uploaded to the web. This is in order to save database space as they are very common words that would not normally be needed in a search. ISYS will reconstruct the search if they do happen to be included in a query. The list has been kept short to accommodate quotations that may contain common words.

The words are as follows: an, are, as, had, has, it’s, its, I’ve, the, was, were. If any of these words do get included in a search, ISYS will delete the common word and reconstruct the search around it. Therefore, a phrase such as “kilroy was here” will be searched as “kilroy” within two words of “here”. If there are still no results for the search, try an advanced search specifying “kilroy” within five words of “here”, or even “kilroy” in the same sentence as “here” to allow for the possibility that there may have been other words in between.

Single letters as well as numbers remain searchable. For example, ISYS would find a phrase such as 4-H clubs.

3. Phrase Searching Tips:

  • if the phrase is a long one, just keep typing; when you reach the end of the box, the system will automatically scroll over.
  • if the phrase would ordinarily have punctuation within it (eg. low-income, federal/provincial), it may be typed with or without the punctuation. The system will find it either way.
  • if you don't find the phrase you entered, it may be that the words you are looking for were spoken in a slightly different order. Try an Advanced Search to find individual keywords from the phrase using the "In the same PARAGRAPH as..." option.  Click here to read more about the "In the same PARAGRAPH as" option.

 


Advanced Search

  • select the order in which the search results should be sorted by clicking on the down arrow.  The default is by document date, but there is also an option to sort by the number of hits in a document or by the relevance factor.

  Sort results by:
  • select the year to be searched  The system defaults to the current year, but there is an option to search in all years (back to 1991) as well as any individual year in between

Select year: 

The following are the options available to allow keywords or phrases to be combined together into more complicated searches. They should be used if a Simple Search does not produce useful results.

As a search query is built up, the search terms entered in the top box will be transferred to the ‘Query so far is’ box whenever a combining option is selected. This makes it easy to keep track of the search string being built.

The query so far is:  

 

1. Search Symbols and Options

a. The symbol stands for the search option "AND which ALSO contain..."   

This search option can be used between two or more keywords or phrases to find any document that contains all of the search terms that are entered

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box

  • click on "" or "AND which ALSO contain..."

  • in the now cleared top box type the second word or phrase to be searched

  • repeat for as many words as necessary

  • click on

 

For example: 

  • type "traffic safety"
  • click on "" or "AND which ALSO contain..."
  • type "Stelmach:"

  • click on

This will find documents that contain both traffic safety and Mr. Stelmach. However, since Hansard documents can be quite long, the two search terms may be several pages apart and therefore not related to one another. An alternative would be to use the ","  or "Within a PARAGRAPH of..." search option.  Click here to learn more about the "Within a PARAGRAPH of..." search option.

"AND" is probably best used in the Hansard databases in combination with a date, such as "What did they say about traffic safety on June 15?" For such a search:

  • type "traffic safety"
  • click on "" or "AND which ALSO contain..."
  • type "June 15"

  • click on

b. The symbol stands for the search option "OR which contain"

This search option can be used between two or more keywords or phrases to find either one or the other, or all of the search terms anywhere in the same document. It is useful when the same topic is referred to using a variety of different terms, such as AEUB / Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, or export highway / north-south highway / free trade highway.

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box
  • click on or "OR which contain"
  • in the now cleared box, type the second word or phrase to be searched

  • repeat for as many words as necessary

  • click on

For example:

  • type "export highway"
  • click on or "OR which contain"
  • type "north south highway"
  • click on or "OR which contain"
  • free trade highway

  • click on


c. The symbol stands for the search option "BUT do NOT contain." 

This search option can be used between two or more keywords or phrases to find documents containing the first search term but not if the second search term also occurs in the same document. This is a way of doing a fairly broad search but eliminating topics that are definitely not wanted.

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box
  • click on or "BUT do NOT contain"
  • in the now cleared top box, type the second word or phrase to be searched

  • click on

For example:

  • type "housing"
  • click on or "BUT do NOT contain"
  • type "low income housing"

  • click on

This will find references to housing, but not if the same document contains references to low-income housing. Keep in mind that Hansard documents average about 20 pages, so this type of search may possibly eliminate a document you may want.


d. The symbol stands for the search option "Within a PARAGRAPH of..."  

This search option can be used between two or more keywords or phrases to find each search term, regardless of what order they occur in, either in the same paragraph or within one paragraph before or after one another. This type of search is more specific than using AND as it finds terms that are much closer to one another, and therefore more likely to be related.

A paragraph is a period followed by a blank line, so in the Hansard databases a paragraph can be as short as one line of text. If a search using this operator does not get results, try the "Within a few paragraphs of" search option.  Click here to learn how to use the search option "Within a  few paragraphs of..."

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box
  • click on or "Within a PARAGRAPH of"
  • in the now cleared top box type the second word or phrase to be searched

  • repeat for as many words as necessary

  • click on

For example:

  • type "traffic safety"
  • click on or "Within a PARAGRAPH of"
  • type "stelmach:"

  • click on

This will find issues where Mr. Stelmach will more likely be speaking about traffic safety than those found if AND had been used to combine the two terms.


e. "Within a FEW paragraphs of"

If searching terms "Within a PARAGRAPH of" does not get results and too many documents are retrieved using other types of searches, try searching the terms within a few paragraphs of one another.

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box
  • staying in the top box, next type "\x\", then type the second keyword or phrase.

  • click on

The two back slashes (\\) replace the "in the same Paragraph as" option, and the "x" between them specifies by how many paragraphs you want to broaden the search. Any number can be used. Leave a blank space between the search terms and the slashes.

For example:

  • in the top box, type "traffic safety \4\ stelmach:"

This will find the term traffic safety within four paragraphs either side of Mr. Stelmach.


f. The symbol stands for the search option "In the SAME PARAGRAPH as."

This can be used between two or more keywords to find each search term, regardless of what order they occur in, within the same paragraph as one another. This type of search is even more specific than the one above and is particularly useful to search for phrases when the word order of the phrase is uncertain. For example, the phrase "environmental impact assessment" might also be phrased as "assessment of the environmental impact" or "assess the impact on the environment."

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box
  • click on or "In the same PARAGRAPH as"
  • in the now cleared top box, type the second word or phrase to be searched

  • repeat for as many words as necessary

  • click on

For example:

  • type "environment*"
  • click on or "In the same PARAGRAPH as"
  • type "impact"

  • click on or "In the same PARAGRAPH as"
  • type "assess*"

  • click on

The asterisks (*) will find all variations of those words, for example assess/assessment, and searching for all the variations in the same paragraph will find the phrase environmental impact assessment regardless of what sequence the words actually occur in, in the document.


g. The symbol stands for the search option "Followed anywhere by."

This search option can be used between two keywords or phrases to find documents in which the first term is followed by the second term somewhere in the same document. It is a very broad type of search but could be useful if it is not known how far apart the terms may be from one another. Use this operator if "Within a FEW paragraphs of" does not retrieve the desired documents.

In the Hansard database, it could also be used in conjunction with the "head" field (see Other Searches for more details).

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box.
  • click on or "Followed anywhere by"
  • in the now cleared top box, type the second word or phrase to be searched

  • click on

For example:

  • type "third reading"
  • click on or "Followed anywhere by"
  • type "real estate"

  • click on

This would find where a Bill with the words ‘real estate’ in its title went through third reading.


h. The symbol stands for the search option "Within 10 WORDS of."  

This produces a search that is even more specific than "In the SAME paragraph as..." and is done exactly the same way.

  • type the first word or phrase to be searched in the top box
  • click on or "Within 10 WORDS of"
  • in the now cleared top box, type the second word or phrase to be searched

  • repeat for as many words as necessary

  • click on

For example:

  • type "environment*"
  • click on or "Within 10 WORDS of"
  • type "impact"

  • click on or "Within 10 WORDS of"
  • type "assess*"

  • click on

Other Searches

1. Date Search

This can be done as either a Simple or Advanced Search.  If you want to search for references in the text to a particular date that may have been mentioned (eg. the September 5th Accord), or if you want to search for a particular sitting date (especially in previous years):

  • type the month and day in ordinary text
  • click on

For example:

  • type "september 5"
  • click on

This will find document(s) actually dated September 5, but it will also find other documents where that date was mentioned somewhere in the text.

There is also a date field inserted at the top of each document, which can be used to search for a range of dates

  • type the dates in the style year/month/day TO year/month/day in DATE: (include the colon after the word date)
  • click on

For example:

  • type "02/11/24 to 02/11/30 in date:"
  • click on

This will find all documents actually dated November 24 to November 30, 2002. It is very useful if you want to search for a topic that may have come up during that time. The date range can be combined with keywords representing the topic, using any of the Advanced Search options.

It can also be used to restrict subsequent searches to just that range of documents (see Query Within Query search).


2. Using the HEAD field to search

Standing Orders of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta sets out the headings under which the business of the House is conducted. These headings are used in the transcripts of Alberta Hansard when transcribing the daily proceedings.

The headings in the text have been designated as a field separate from the rest of the text by inserting the word “head:” at the beginning of lines containing those headings. A search using the heading field is very specific as the search is restricted to just that field, ignoring the rest of the text.

Searches using headings can be done by using the Simple Search screen in most cases. When the Advanced Search screen is required, this is indicated after the relevant heading below. Any time a heading is used in combination with other keywords, however, always use the Advanced Search screen.

When using a heading as a search term, the entire heading does not necessarily need to be typed, just type enough to distinguish it from any other heading. Some headings are often referred to by an informal term, but the formal term must be used when searching, since the informal headings do not appear in the heading field in the text.

The following is an alphabetical list of the headings, both informal and official, along with the search terms needed to do a search.

Sample searches are located at the end of this list.

Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund (Used up until 1994)
Search term: heritage in head:

Bills, Government (formal heading is Government Bills and Orders)
Search term: government bills in head: BUT NOT public bills in head: (Use Advanced Search)

Bills, Introduction of (formal heading is Introduction of Bills)
Search term: introduction of bills in head:

Bills, Private (formal heading is Private Bills)
Search term: private bills in head:

Bills, Private members’ (formal heading is Public Bills and Orders Other Than Government Bills and Orders)
Search term: public bills in head:

Budget Address
Search term: budget in head:

Capital Fund Estimates (Used up until 1993)
Search term: capital fund in head:

Committee of Supply
Search term: supply in head:

Committee of the Whole
Search term: whole in head:

Committees, Presenting reports by (formal heading is Presenting Reports by Standing and Special Committees)
Search term: presenting reports in head:

Consideration of Her Honour the Lieutenant Governor’s Speech
Search term: honour in head:

Deputy Chair of Committees, Election of (formal heading is Election of Deputy Chair of Committees)
Search term: deputy chair in head:

Deputy Speaker and, Election of (formal heading is Election of Deputy Speaker and)
Search term: deputy speaker in head:

Election of Deputy Chair of Committees
Search term: deputy chair in head:

Election of Deputy Speaker and
Search term: deputy speaker in head:

Election of Speaker
Search term: election of speaker in head:

Emergency Debate
Search term: emergency in head:

Estimates
Search term: estimates in head:

First reading of Bills (formal heading is Introduction of Bills)
Search term: introduction of bills in head:

Government Bills and Orders
Search term: government bills in head: BUT NOT public bills in head: (use Advanced Search)

Government Motions
Search term: government motions in head:

Government Motions, Motions Other than (official heading is Motions Other than Government Motions)
Search term: motions other than in head:

Guests, Introduction of (official heading is Introduction of Guests)
Search term: guests in head:

Guests, Introduction of Special (official heading was Introduction of Special Guests; used up until 1993)
Search term: special guests in head:

Interim Estimates
Search term: interim in head:

Introduction of Bills
Search term: introduction of bills in head:

Introduction of Guests (used to introduce school groups and other guests)
Search term: guests in head:

Introduction of Special Guests (used to introduce school groups and other guests; used up until 1993)
Search term: special guests in head:

Introduction of Visitors (used to introduce visiting parliamentarians, diplomats, et cetera)
Search term: visitors in head:

Lottery Fund Estimates
Search term: lottery in head:

Main Estimates
Search term: main in head:

Members’ Statements
Search term: members in head:

Ministerial Statements
Search term: ministerial in head:

Motions for Returns
Search term: motions for returns in head:

Motions Other than Government Motions
Search term: motions other than in head:

Motions under Standing Order 40
Search term: standing order in head:

Notices of Motions
Search term: notices in head:

Oral Question Period
Search term: oral in head:

Orders of the Day
Search term: day in head:

Prayers
Search term: prayers in head:

Presenting Petitions
Search term: petitions in head:

Presenting Reports by Standing and Special Committees
Search term: presenting reports in head:

Private Bills
Search term: private bills in head:

Private members’ Bills (Official heading is Public Bills and Orders Other Than Government Bills and Orders)
Search term: public bills in head:

Private members’ motions (Official heading is Motions Other than Government Motions)
Search term: motions other than in head:

Privilege
Search term: privilege in head:

Projected Government Business
Search term: projected in head:

Public Bills and Orders Other Than Government Bills and Orders
Search term: public bills in head:

Question Period (official heading is Oral Question Period)
Search term: oral in head:

Questions, Written (official heading is Written Questions)
Search term: written in head:

Recognitions
Search term: recognitions in head:

Reports, Tabling (official heading is Tabling Returns and Reports)
Search term: tabling in head:

Reports by committees, Presenting (official heading is Presenting Reports by Standing and Special Committees)
Search term: presenting reports in head:

Request for Emergency Debate
Search term: request in head:

Returns, Motions for (official heading is Motions for Returns)
Search term: motions for returns in head:

Returns, Tabling (official heading is Tabling Returns and Reports)
Search term: tabling in head:

Royal Assent
Search term: royal in head:

Second Reading
Search term: second in head

Speaker, Election of (official heading is Election of Speaker)
Search term: election of speaker in head:

Special Guests, Introduction of (official heading is Introduction of Special Guests; used up until 1993)
Search term: special guests in head:

Speech from the Throne
Search term: throne in head:

Speech from the Throne debate (official heading is Consideration of Her Honour the Lieutenant Governor’s Speech)
Search term: honour in head:

Statement by the Speaker
Search term: statement by in head:

Supplementary Estimates
Search term: supplementary in head:

Supply committee (official heading is Committee of Supply)
Search term: supply in head:

Tabling Returns and Reports
Search term: tabling in head:

Tablings to the Clerk
Search term: tablings in head: (or to avoid possible confusion: clerk in head:)

Third Reading
Search term: third in head:

Throne Speech debate (official heading is Consideration of Her Honour the Lieutenant Governor’s Speech)
Search term: honour in head:

Visitors, Introduction of (official heading is Introduction of Visitors)
Search term: visitors in head:

Written Questions
Search term: written in head:

Sample Searches

a) Simple Search

To find all Throne Speeches from the past 10 years:

  • select the All years option from the Select year drop down list
  • type the text of the heading followed by “in head:” (Always include the colon after the word “head”)
  • click on Search

    Search would be:

    • select All years option
    • type “throne in head:”
    • click on Search

There should be one document per year; click on the dates you wish to see. Should there be more than one document for a given year, it probably means there was an election during that year. The earlier date will be from the session preceding the election; the later date will be from the session following the election.

b) Advanced Search
T o find a Member's Statement made by a particular member:

  • type the text of the heading followed by "in head:" (Always include the colon after the word "head" in the top box)
  • click on or "Followed anywhere by"
  • in the now cleared box, type the member's surname to be searched, including a colon at the end

    Search would be:

    • type "members' statements in head:"
    • click on or "Followed anywhere by"
    • type "Stelmach:"
    • click on

The "Followed anywhere by" option was used in this case, as there are usually several members making such statements on the day reserved for this order of business, and it won’t be known if the member you are looking for was first or last to make a statement. The search may also produce documents that aren’t relevant, as the member may be speaking under a completely different heading further on in the proceedings. Just view all the retrieved documents to find the one you want.


3. Searching for Divisions (Recorded votes)

At times the vote on an issue in the Legislature is recorded, meaning that the name of each member is recorded in the Assembly’s records (and printed in Hansard) as being either "For the motion" or "Against the motion." There is no heading in the text for divisions, but it is always preceded in the text by the editorial phrase "The division bell was rung at ..."

So to find out how a particular member voted, do an Advanced Search for the phrase "division bell," select or "Followed anywhere by," and then enter the name of the member without a colon in this case, as names are listed in a division table in the text and therefore do not have a colon after their name.

  • type "division bell"
  • click on or "Followed anywhere by"
  • type "abbott"

  • click on

4. Query Within Query (Restricting a subsequent search to the previous search’s results)

It is possible to narrow down a search by doing an initial search and then restricting all subsequent searches to the documents resulting from the first one. This has the effect of eliminating a lot of irrelevant documents and can make searching more precise.

The search terms for the second and any subsequent search are entered in the box labeled "Search within results" at the end of the Search Results screen.

Search within results:

Any of the Advanced Search options may be used but must be typed out as part of the search string (You won’t be able to click on any of them.) The abbreviations for the options are as follows:

  • "AND which ALSO contain"  >  AND
  • "OR which contain"   >  OR
  • "BUT do NOT contain"   >  NOT
  • "Within a paragraph of"  >   \\
  • "In the same paragraph as"   >  //
  • "Within 10 words of"  >  /10/
  • "Followed anywhere by"   >  ...

For example, to find where a member spoke on a private member’s motion about terrorism, the initial search would be for documents containing the heading "Motions Other than Government Motions" (or private members’ motions) as this item of business only comes up once a week. Subsequent searches would only search documents from that particular day, thus eliminating documents from other sitting days, making the search more precise.

  • in the top box, type "motions other than government motions in head:"
  • in the "Search within results" box at the end of the Search Results screen, type "cenaiko: \\ terror*"

  • click on

The member’s name is Cenaiko. The search is for this name within a paragraph of words beginning with terror (such as terrorist, terrorists, terrorism). If "Within a paragraph of" does not yield results, try a broader search ‘within 3 paragraphs of.’

  • cenaiko: \3\ terror*then click on

5.)Searching PDF documents (Hansard, committee transcripts, and indexes)

Some documents on the Assembly website are only available as PDF documents and some are available as either PDF or HTML documents. Follow these instructions to use the search capabilities of Adobe Reader to find where a word is mentioned in a PDF document:
  • With the PDF document on screen, click on the binoculars button.
  • Type the word you are looking for in the “Search PDF” box that appears on the right.
  • Click in “Whole words only” box.
  • Click on “Search.”
  • A “Results” box will list all of the locations in the document for the word you have searched, and will display the document at the first mention of that word. If that is not what you are looking for, click on the underlined search term of the next line in the Results box to go to the next mention of that word in the document. Repeat until you get to the information you are looking for.
Indexes

On the website are indexes providing subject access to Hansard transcripts and all standing and special committee meeting transcripts. The indexes are an alternative to keyword searching for finding topics in the transcripts, and provide the page numbers in the transcripts where the remarks about those topics can be read.

In order to get from the index to the transcripts, you will need to look up the page number in the Page Number Directory found at the beginning of each index. The directory enables you to find the date of the transcript containing a given page number.

To find a subject heading in the index:
  • Use the Adobe search as described above to find the topic you want.
  • Make a note of the page numbers on the index entry you find for this topic.
  • Go to the Page Number Directory at the top of the index document.
  • In the Pages column, find the range of pages that contains the page number you’ve found, then look in the Date column on the same line to determine the date of the transcript(s) that contain that page number. (Make a note of whether it is an afternoon or evening transcript.)
To find the transcript containing the text corresponding to that page number:
  • Exit the index and return to the Hansard search screen.
  • Click on the Display tab.
  • From the year dropdown list, select the year you need.
  • Scroll through the date dropdown list and select the date you found.
  • Scroll through the document to the page number you found, or do an Adobe search for the page number, which will take you right to it.
For example:

To find out if there have been any points of privilege raised during a session, an index search would be more efficient than a keyword search. The index has one heading for this, whereas a keyword search would find the word ‘privilege’ regardless of the context in which it is used (for example: “Mr. Speaker: It is a privilege to rise ...”) so will retrieve many more documents than you need.
  • In the index, do an Adobe search for the word ‘privilege’.
  • Make a note of the page numbers under that heading.
  • Go to the Page Number Directory at the top of that index and find the dates of the transcripts containing those page numbers.
  • Exit the index and return to the Hansard search screen.
  • Click on the Display tab.
  • Select the relevant year from the dropdown list.
  • Select one of the dates you have found.
  • Do an Adobe search for the page number within that transcript (do not search the word “privilege” as again this may give you more occurrences of that word than you want). This will take you to the page where the point of privilege is located.
  • Repeat for each date you find.

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